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mar 23, 2017

The latest Internet of Things beacon is made with 100% Brazilian technology

After the Internet itself, the Internet of Things (IoT) will revolutionize daily human life. The concept of IoT is simple yet intricate, connecting all appliances, machines, and/or devices we use everyday to one other so that we can be constantly connected. And Brazil is at the forefront of the latest IoT technology, essential to its development: the first purely Brazilian beacon. 

Taggen, a company specialized in IoT solutions, developed the first beacon in collaboration with the EMBRAPII Telecommunications Research and Development Center (CPqD). The project has already been approved by the Brazilian national telecommunications agency (Anatel) for further development and use. 

“With the help of CPqD, we were able to conduct experiments with the objective of validating resources and advantages of our product, for a consistent launch on the national market,” said Mario Prado, the Chief Technology Officer of Taggen IoT Solutions. Prado adds that the Taggen Beacon follows principal standards of the international market, such as Apple’s iBeacon and Google’s EddyStone.

Beacons use Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology to detect the proximity of other devices (also using Bluetooth) and transmit a unique identifying number. Similar to how smartphones and laptops communicate with each other, the new beacon technology is essential to the concept of the IoT in that it allows different objects to "converse" with one other. 

However, the Brazilian technology has certain performance advantages. According to Prado, the Taggen Beacon consumes less energy, allowing for 15% longer use. Furthermore, the beacon’s signal is extremely strong, and in certain cases can reach up to 200 meters.

Because the beacon can be detected by any smartphone, it allows for the creation of new apps that can provide information to users and third-party companies. The business possibilities are endless, opening up opportunities for new publicity strategies, the localization of persons and objects, indoor and outdoor navigation, traceability, and more. Soon, Taggen will launch a “mini-platform” of tools that will help “non-experts” navigate the new technology and create their own solutions to diverse problems without having to specialize in the ins-and-outs of the software.

The Brazilian beacon was launched last September during the 1st Brazilian and Latin American Forum of the Internet of Things, and was met with great success. At the request of its clients, Taggen is already at work developing an additional beacon.

 “Brazil proves once again that it has the same expertise and technological capacity, in addition to the innovative entrepreneurship, as any of the best and biggest world players who are also preparing for this race to the top,” says Taggen’s CEO, Werter Padilha. Taggen is based in Campinas, a city in the state of São Paulo, and considered a “Latin American Silicon Valley.".