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nov 01, 2017

Brazilian game gains international acclaim

This year, not one but two Brazilian games have found their way into the PAX-10, a well-known list of the best independent games that display at the Penny Arcade Expo (PAX) every year. Celeste, from Brazilian studio MiniBoss, is one of the selections. But this year is also the first time that an entirely Brazilian game has been selected.

The 100% Brazilian game selected, No Heroes Here, is a 2D Co-op game for up to four players. In the game, the war-struck Kingdom of Noobland has lost its heroes, leaving it up to gamers to defend the castle against waves of enemies. But, as the name suggests, no individual player is a hero: the only way to win is to cooperate with other players to create different types of ammunition, weapons and tactics to defeat enemies.

The PAX-10 list is made up by 50 jurors from all over the world. PAX is a big deal for video gamers and video game-makers alike. The event is a series of gaming festivals held in cities across the planet - Seattle, Boston, Melbourne, Philadelphia, and San Antonio.

The festival is a celebration of gamer culture, with themed concerts, panels on game topics, tournaments and freeplay areas, but it’s also a chance for both independent and major game developers to show off their latest products. And while its line-up has traditionally been dominated by US and European countries, that might be about to change.

No Heroes Here made the cut for the PAX-10 list in September this year, scooping the festival’s Indie prize at the same time. To wind up on the list, games are subject to evaluation from a selection jury of more than 50 tastemakers and market experts. Particularly important to selection is a general fun factor and gameplay elements.

Developed and published by indie gaming company Mad Mimic Interactive, No Heroes Here will be available for the general public on October 3 on PC and Mac (via Steam). In the first quarter of 2018, the company plans to bring the game to PlayStation 4 and Nintendo Switch.

It seems it will do so with some serious acclaim from heavy-hitting names in the gaming world; earlier this year, it also won Best Social Game at the Game Connection Awards (GCA).

Gaming culture has grown strong in Brazil in recent years, creating a whole new group of gamers and bringing with it a raft of new developers. This year’s Independent Games Festival drew in serious crowds, and indie developers got a lot of attention – approximately 20,000 Brazilians played independent games at the festival.